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posted by [personal profile] jorhett at 09:26am on 16/04/2016 under

This year my income as a writer almost matched my consulting income. Although neither are appreciable sums, it represents a distinct shift in my non-dayjob efforts of which I am both proud, and deeply interested in developing further.

You can read the original article at http://www.netconsonance.com/2016/04/the-changing-nature-of-my-business/. Comments are welcome here or there as you please.
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posted by [personal profile] jorhett at 03:19pm on 18/10/2014 under ,

I use Android phones and the fastest way for me to enter text is to Swype or Flow the words. This is where you press the first key then swype your finger from one letter to another without picking up your finger. It was incredibly fast way to enter text…until keyboards decided that predicting your words is so important that you can’t turn it off.

It is perhaps understandable that when I swype F-I-X-E-S that it might insert F-O-X-E-S. I’m really not prone to talk about foxes, but I understand that guess.

I completely fail to understand when I swype my fingers through T-U-R-N-S and get F-I-R-M-S. Those letters aren’t close. No, my fingers weren’t inaccurate. Yes, I really meant turns. Worse yet is that turns is a valid English word, is found in the keyboard’s dictionary, but is not in the list of suggestions.

Samsung, Google, Swype, SwiftKey: Trust me. I swyped exactly what I meant. You can suggest something else but please insert the word I swyped. Not what you think I meant. Because I really, truly, never write sentences on my phone containing duck.

You can read the original article at http://www.netconsonance.com/2014/10/where-did-that-duck-come-from/. Comments are welcome here or there as you please.
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posted by [personal profile] jorhett at 09:11am on 10/09/2014 under

Many people seem to believe that the battle for Net Neutrality is a geek matter that won’t concern them. In reality, the loss of Net Neutrality is an important issue that will cost everyone significant time and money.

If the proposed legislation passed, it explicitly authorizes Internet access companies to charge you more to access sites that haven’t paid them as well. Yes, that’s right, the Internet access company would get paid by both sides for the same bytes. However, the most important part of the legislation is that it allows them to block and slow down sites which haven’t paid them. Let’s discuss what this means to you:

Read the rest of this entry »

You can read the original article at http://www.netconsonance.com/2014/09/why-net-neutrality-matters-to-you/. Comments are welcome here or there as you please.

jorhett: (Default)
posted by [personal profile] jorhett at 09:11am on 10/09/2014 under

Many people seem to believe that the battle for Net Neutrality is a geek matter that won’t concern them. In reality, the loss of Net Neutrality is an important issue that will cost everyone significant time and money.

If the proposed legislation passed, it explicitly authorizes Internet access companies to charge you more to access sites that haven’t paid them as well. Yes, that’s right, the Internet access company would get paid by both sides for the same bytes. However, the most important part of the legislation is that it allows them to block and slow down sites which haven’t paid them. Let’s discuss what this means to you:

1. You would face slowdowns to access sites that matter to you.
2. If you ran a website, you would have to negotiate with and pay each and every Internet provider on the planet to serve your content to their customers.
3. Site and services you use could be blocked if they compete with a service provided by an Internet access company.

Today you pay your Internet access based on bytes transferred, or bytes which could be transferred. This is fair and reasonable “pay for what you use” billing. This legislation allows and encourages Internet access companies to double dip, to get paid many times for the same bytes.

There is absolutely nothing in the legislation that requires the Internet providers to be reasonable, or to provide a base level of service to sites. If this legislation passes, it would be in the economic interest of every Internet provider to make exclusive, high-value deals with providers of services to ensure all their competitors are blocked.

This means you will have access only to services that your ISP decides you can access.

Today, September 10th, is the very last day that the FCC is accepting comments. Go there now, and speak your mind. This link might work, but sometimes fails: http://apps.fcc.gov/ecfs/upload/begin?procName=14-28&filedFrom=X

If that link fails, do this:
1. Visit http://FCC.gov/comments
2. Find the title “14-28 Protecting and Promoting the Open Internet.”
3. Click the number “14-28”
5. Express how this will affect you
6. Make sure to click “Confirm” on the following page to submit your comments.

You can read the original article at http://www.netconsonance.com/2014/09/why-net-neutrality-matters-to-you/. Comments are welcome here or there as you please.
jorhett: (Default)

Today I received a spam that the headers clearly showed was generated within Yahoo and went directly from their mail system to mine. So I reported it to their published Abuse address, so that Yahoo would know their user is spamming. I received back the following e-mail:

This is an automated response; please do not reply to this email as replies will not be answered.

To report spam, security, or abuse-related issues involving Yahoo!'s services, please go to http://abuse.yahoo.com.

Thank you,

Yahoo! Customer Care

Fail #1: They are required to accept abuse reports at their published Abuse address.

Fail #2: Going to this address gets redirected to http://help.yahoo.com/abuse/ which has hundreds of different links, but after spending 30 minutes looking through every single one of them not a single one provides a place to report a spam sent by Yahoo.

Result: Yahoo no longer accepts spam reports. I am therefore blocking Yahoo on every mail gateway for which I have control, and listing them in the Pink Providers blacklist effective immediately.

You can read the original article at http://www.netconsonance.com/2014/08/yahoo-no-longer-accepts-abuse-reports/. Comments are welcome here or there as you please.
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posted by [personal profile] jorhett at 10:08am on 26/06/2014 under ,

When I try to use my phone in a natural and effective manner, how it knows so much better than me what I need. How it shows me the better path of disconnection and confusion. Nothing is better than backing up and retyping a word time and time again. My exact and correct spelling is so much less entertaining than the nonsense words my phone would prefer to send.

Read the rest of this entry »

You can read the original article at http://www.netconsonance.com/2014/06/how-technology-improves-our-fail/. Comments are welcome here or there as you please.

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posted by [personal profile] jorhett at 10:43am on 12/06/2014 under

One thing I am discovering about the difference between writing fiction and writing non-fiction technology books is that technology books are never really done.

With fiction, at some point you have told the story you are intending to tell. You may well have sequels to write, but a given story eventually is complete.

When you are working on non-fiction, there is always something more to add. Right as you are finishing the final review process, an important change is happening in the project core. You find a new tool that significantly improves on the painful process you documented in your book. The next version of the software is going to arrive after your book goes to the printer.

It never ends.

You can read the original article at http://www.netconsonance.com/2014/06/technology-books-are-never-done/. Comments are welcome here or there as you please.
jorhett: (Default)

My first blog post for Taos was just published: http://www.taos.com/2014/02/27/choose-security-partners-carefully/

This post covers the reality of security products: you can’t buy trust. Or as seems to have occurred this time, someone might be paying more than you to ensure your crypto is weak. You have to acquire the talent to ensure what you are using meets your needs.

I suspect that readers of this blog might point out that my summary has always been true: nobody should ever have trusted RSA blindly. My target audience for that post is people who may not have realized this before.

You can read the original article at http://www.netconsonance.com/2014/02/when-did-my-business-become-the-product-rsa-was-selling/. Comments are welcome here or there as you please.
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posted by [personal profile] jorhett at 07:04am on 10/05/2013 under

If you work or play with computers or phones or technology in any form, you probably spend more a significant portion of your life looking for answers on the Internet. If you are a kind and sharing person, you may even post answers you have found or created to a blog or solutions site. When you do, please ensure that your post has the following information, as it really would improve its usefulness to the reader:

Read the rest of this entry »

You can read the original article at http://www.netconsonance.com/2013/05/a-plea-for-improving-tech-tips-on-the-internet/. Comments are welcome here or there as you please.

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